Thursday, April 24, 2014

Dal Bati (Dal Baafla / Dal and Wheat dumpling)

Today I am posting a recipe from Rajastan. Every day this month I will post a recipe from a different state in India.


Rajastan is located in western India. Part of the state is a desert and the climate is mostly arid. Rajastan brings to mind color. The traditional clothes of Rajastan are colorful as is the home decor. After living in Arizona for two decades I believe the the people in arid climates bring color to their life to compensate for the dull greens and browns in the landscape. In fact nature too participates in this exercise. All flowers from these regions are brilliantly colored reds, oranges and yellows. When I first saw the colorful skirts of the Mariachi dancers they reminded me of the colorful skirts worn by the Ghoomar dancers.

Ghoomar is a traditional dance from Rajastan. If you are familiar with traditional dances then you should know the warrior dance where men sling dummy horses over their shoulders and dance. Imagine my surprise when at a winter show of Mexican dances one of the dance featured men with horses slung over their shoulder. Apparently the traditional comes from Spain. Small world!

I visited Jaipur as a child for a day trip from Delhi. We traveled on the Pink City Express and had a delightful day visiting all the famed palaces in Jaipur. I think the highlight for me as a child was the peacocks in the fields that we passed on the train ride.

Back to the recipe - Dal Bati is a baked wheat dumpling eaten with dal. It is a very popular preparation in Rajastan found at street side food vendors, in restaurants and homes.


The Dal Bati is dunked in ghee before it is served. I do not believe I could ever dunk anything in ghee, not even a modak. I skipped the ghee altogether. I am sure that affected the taste but since we do not know how it tastes with the ghee we did not miss anything.

I do not have a single source for this recipe. I did read up recipes on the web and talked to a friend for this recipe.

You will need
For the Bati
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 cup semolina
3 tbsp. olive oil
1/2 tsp. baking powder

For the dal
1 cups toor dal
1/2 cup masoor dal
1 onion
4-5 cloves garlic
1 Serrano pepper
2 tomatoes
3 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. mustard seeds
1 tsp. cumin seeds
1 tsp. turmeric powder
1/4 tsp. asafoetida
1 tsp. ginger paste
1 tbsp. coriander cumin powder
1/2 tsp. paprika
salt to taste

For the dal topping
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. cumin seeds
1/4 tsp. paprika

To make the Bati
Add all the ingredients for the bati in a mixing bowl. Using water mix together to form a dough. Knead with a touch of olive oil on your finger tips until smooth and soft. Keep aside for 30 minutes.
Heat about 6 cups of water in a large pan. Divide the dough into lemon size portions.


Roll each portion into a flattened ball on the palm of your hand and drop it in the heated water.


Let the water come to a boil. As the temperature of the water rises the partially cooked bati will rise to the surface of the water.


Preheat the oven to 350 F. Let it simmer for a couple of minutes and then take them out of the water. Allow water to drain on a paper towel.


Place a parchment paper on a baking sheet. Transfer the drained bati on to the baking sheet.


Bake for 25 minutes. 15 minutes into baking turn them over and continue to bake.


Remove the fully baked and browned bati from the oven and allow to cool.

To the make the dal
Pressure cook the toor and masur dal. Heat oil in a pan and add the mustard and cumin seeds. When the mustard seeds crackle add the asafoetida and onion. Cook for a couple minutes and add tomato, ginger and all the remaining spices.


Mix well and let it cook until the tomato is soft and mushy. Add the dal and bring it to a boil. Season with salt. and let it cook for a few more minutes. Turn off the heat.


To put it together
In a small pan heat the oil for the dal topping. As soon as the oil is heated turn off heat. Add the cumin seeds and when they turn color add the paprika.


Serve hot dal in a bowl with a little of the topping along with the dal bati. If desired crack the bati and pour a little ghee over the top.

This is my entry for day 24 of BM #39 for the state of Rajastan. Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM#39.








17 comments:

  1. you did the boiled version, it looks nice, i think this way of making is similar to bagel making, which i am waiting to try..the first picture looks awesome, suggest making it xLarge size would look very good

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  2. An authentic Rajasthani dish, cant ask more, but boiled version sounds interesting, never tried this method, let me try soon.

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  3. such an authentic one!!! and the boiled version is looking interesting...

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  4. wow..this is one dish that we all love at home...its the ghee in it that does not allow us to eat..it says...NO...but yet I must say one of the best dishes has been chosen by you and very well made.

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  5. I did this for ICC for Rajasthan, however looks like I boiled it as well before frying it..so that makes it Baafla..I realized only after reading about baafla for this bm...I enjoyed eating this..

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  6. I made this a while back with the recipe I had from my friend. Yours came out great.

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  7. Mmmm! I am bookmaking this one. I have been postponing making this one for ages.

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  8. Yumm. I remember making it for ICC and we love it.

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  9. I have not made it this way. I think boiling would give it a lovely soft texture even after baking them!

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  10. Such a classic and traditional combo,never tried boiling the batis,will try this way when I make next time..

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  11. Bati preparation is similar to bafla from MP. Dal bati looks delicious and such a classic combination for the state.

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  12. We made this for one of the ICC editions and loved it.And yes, dunking it in ghee is scary and I too skipped that part :)

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  13. I like this healthier version of baking - when valli had this for icc some time back, we had boiled and then fried - yours came out looking so delicious - I too had skipped the ghee part

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  14. Very very traditional and tempting dish from rajasthan :) As its my native i love to make daal baati churma a lot , rajasthani dal baati is very much similar to the baafla version of MP .. you have made it perfect dear :)

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  15. these dal batis look delicious. i didnt make them as I thought they were too much work. but these are definitely on my to-try list after this mega marathon

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  16. They look pretty good. Somehow I never dared to make them as it sounds tedious to me.

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  17. Classic dish, Looks delicious! Though I have enjoyed these in many restaurants, haven't dared to try this at home! !!

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