Sunday, April 13, 2014

Dudali (Arrowroot Halwa)

Today I am posting a recipe from Karnataka. Every day this month I will post a recipe from a different state in India.


Karnataka is a coastal state to the south of Maharashtra. It is a big state with several regions. As with most states this size there are many sub cultures in the state. The coastal region especially to the north is very different from southern areas like Bangalore and Mysore.



The regions have different cuisines and art. In Shimoga district in the western ghat an art form Chittara is very popular. Chittara, meaning picture, was used to decorate the walls of the homes in the region were it originated. It has since been identified as an ancient art form that needs to be preserved. You will find Chittara paintings on canvas and pots sold commercially providing the artist much needed money to keep the art alive. The picture to the left is an example of this style.



Karnataki kashida is decorative needlework that is very pretty and dainty. It is called blackwork/kasuti in some parts of the world and is a centuries old art. Sarees, kurtas, and other household linens are embroidered with this type of needlework. The picture on the right is a sample of kashida.


Unlike other parts of Karnataka where Kannada is the primary spoken language Konkani is spoken along the coast in Uttara (north) Kanada. Actually Konkani is spoken along the western coast of India from Malwan/Ratnagiri in Maharashtra, Goa and all the way to Mangalore in Karnataka. The dialects are very different but the language is called Konkani.

Dudali is a dish that is popular in Konkani speaking coastal Karnataka. I have since learnt that it is made in Kerala as well. Dudali is made with arrowroot powder. This powder is derived from a tuber which is washed, cleaned, dried and then powdered. Arrowroot is a thickening starch like tapioca or cornstarch. When cooked with milk and coconut and cooled, it turns into this milky white, smooth textured barfi.

I had this dish at a friends house and asked her for the recipe. Like a score of other recipes I never tried it until now.

You will need
1 cup arrowroot powder
1/4 cup sugar
1 cup milk
1 cup water
2 tbsp. thick coconut milk or coconut pulp
2 pods cardamom
a few cashews for garnish

Shell the cardamom pods and pound the seeds into a powder. Keep aside. Grease a baking tray and keep aside.
Whisk together the arrowroot powder, sugar, milk and water in a pan and bring to a boil on medium heat.


Add the coconut milk or pulp. Continue to whisk continuously while the mixture thickens. Lower heat if needed.


As the mixture thickens it will start leaving the edges of the pan.


Transfer to the greased dish and smooth out the top with the moistened bottom of a cup. Let it cool for an hour.


Cut it into barfi sized squares and serve.


This is my entry for day 13 of BM #39 for the state of Karnataka. Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM#39.








21 comments:

  1. that is a quick and easy sweet!!! lovely one!!

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  2. Very interesting Varada, though I have heard about this halwa, this is the first time actually reading it..very well made..

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  3. Quick and very tasty halwa, low on fat as usually indian halwa are rich in ghee

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  4. Looks like an easy and very addictive halwa, am learning many new dishes from this BM, wonderful choice.

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  5. Looks superb and must have tasted awesome....

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  6. very interesting halwa..tell me the pieces are soft ?..and dont you need to flavor it up with something..the coconut pulp.is it enough to give that flavor, would love to try.

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    1. Vaishali, the pieces are soft and very mildly flavored.

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  7. Looks so delicious. I think we can substitute arrowroot with corn flour?

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    Replies
    1. Arrowroot powder is starch so you should be able to substitute corn flour.

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  8. Halwa with arrowroot flour is something quiet new to me,sounds delicious and easy to make...

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  9. enjoy your art as much as your recipes.. the arrowroot burfi is very new to me

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  10. I heard about this halwa from friends. But never bought aroow root flour. Sounds very interesting.

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  11. That is a yummy looking burfi with arrowroot.

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  12. This is a new dish to me and I am from Karnataka. I love the halwa is looks so yum. Can the arrowroot be substituted with corn flour? I really want to try this.

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    Replies
    1. You should be able to substitute arrowroot powder with corn flour, however arrow root powder has a distinct taste that corn flour lacks.

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  13. Both the artworks are very pretty. I have heard of arrowroot powder and the halwa but never made it. Looks yum.

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  14. Looks yummy. Does the arrowroot powder have any flavor of it's own or is it bland?

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  15. Oh wow! very different halwa. Where did you get the arrowroot powder? is it available in the regular stores or in indian stores?

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    1. I have never seen in the regular grocery stores. I got it from the Indian store.

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  16. very new halwa with arrowroot pd looks fabulous dear :) making me drool here .. they look super soft !!

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  17. Fabulous halwa!! Love the details u give on art of that state!!!

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